An Appropriate Political Cartoon:

(From Michael Ramirez. Click to enlarge.)

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Notable Quotables: The "Oh, Snap!" Edition

“He went to Massachusetts to campaign against Scott Brown; Brown is now a senator. He went to New Jersey to campaign against Chris Christie, who’s now governor. He went to Virginia to campaign against Bob McDonnell, who’s now governor. He campaigned for the healthcare plan extensively, it became less popular. He campaigned in 2010 for the Democrats, they were shellacked. He began, in a sense, his presidency flying to Copenhagen to get Chicago the Olympics; Chicago was the first city eliminated. There is no evidence that the man has the rhetorical powers that he is relying on.” — Columnist George F. Will, speaking on ABC’s This Week.

Oooh. Feel the burn!

(Hat tip to NRO.)

Good News!

The July crunch is now over. On Sunday, I successfully cast my Hugo Awards ballot.

What does this have to do with Right Fans Poli-Talk? Well, because I have finished reading the nominated stories and novels included in my voter packet, I can finally get back to some of my real-world oriented works in progress — and that means more original political content on this side of our blog. Woot!

From this point forward, I hope to publish long posts here at least two or three times per week. Links – or commentary from other contributors – will fill out the remaining days.

And speaking of links: Are you one of the many who refuse to watch Obama’s television appearances (opting instead to read the transcripts later) because you just can’t stand to listen to him live? Well, Belladonna Rogers of Pajamas Media seems to have hit upon the reason for your instinctive aversion to the current POTUS:

Coping With Obama-Induced Irritation Syndrome (OIIS): A Guide for the Perplexed

When you add it all up, it’s clear that Obama deploys mockery, derision, humiliation, ridicule, contempt, scorn and downright nastiness when he’s outside the comfort zone of people he knows and likes. His forays into the heartland seem to evoke either anxiety or hostility that he tries to mask with what he thinks is humor but that comes across to others as a screeching fingernail across the blackboards of our souls. He’s not the smooth, cool guy his PR machine imagines he is: he’s a snob, and a nasty snob at that. He seems to be utterly unaware of how he comes off: unconscious of the intolerance, the disrespect, and the profound ignorance of how people unlike himself and his cronies live, think and feel.

This times a billion. I also think over-exposure is playing a role. Obama’s media boot-lickers have put him on TV so many times that folks like my Mom are sick of seeing his face (let alone of hearing him talk down to the rest of us).

Speechworld vs. Realworld

I was unable to finish the sixth part of my “Vision for America” series today, so enjoy the following article in the meantime:

Speechworld vs. Realworld
by Mark Steyn @ NRO

The Democrats seem to have given up on budgets. Hey, who can blame them? They’ve got a ballpark figure: Let’s raise $2 trillion in revenue every year, and then spend $4 trillion. That seems to work pretty well, so why get hung up on a lot of fine print? Harry Reid says the Senate has no plans to produce a budget, but in April the president did give a speech about “a new budget framework” that he said would save $4 trillion over the next twelve years.

That would be 2023, if you’re minded to take him seriously. Paul Ryan, chairman of the House Budget Committee, did. Last week he asked Douglas Elmendorf, director of the Congressional Budget Office, if he’d “estimated the budget impact of this framework.”

“No, Mr. Chairman,” replied Director Elmendorf, deadpan. “We don’t estimate speeches. We need much more specificity than was provided in that speech.”

“We don’t estimate speeches”: There’s an epitaph to chisel on the tombstone of the republic. Unfortunately for those of us on the receiving end, giving speeches is what Obama does.

Heh. Yes, that pretty much covers it.

Double-U Tee Eff?

Bill Clinton commands stage at White House
by Ben Feller @ AP

Clinton comfortably outlined how the pending package of tax cuts, business incentives and unemployment benefits would boost the economy — even though it included tax help for the wealthy that Obama had to swallow.

“There’s never a perfect bipartisan bill in the eyes of a partisan,” Clinton said. “But I really believe this will be a significant net-plus for the country.”

When he finished his pitch, Clinton played the role of humble guy, saying, “So, for whatever it’s worth, that’s what I think.”

“It’s worth a lot,” Obama insisted.

Clinton was asked what advice he had for Obama, given the context of the times: the current president has to deal with a Republican Party that just won a convincing victory in the midterm election and will soon grab control of the House. Clinton faced the same halfway through his embattled first term in 1994, worked some major deals with the opposing party and rebounded to re-election.

“I have a general rule,” Clinton said, “which is that whatever he asked me about my advice, and whatever I say should become public only if he decides to make it public.” Obama didn’t provide that permission, saying: “I’ve been keeping the First Lady waiting for about half an hour, so I’m going to take off.”

The current president left it to Gibbs to decide when Clinton’s questioning would be cut off.

I have no words. No words.

More on Obama’s Bad Character

American Narcissus:
The vanity of Barack Obama

by Jonathon V. Last @ The Weekly Standard

Looking at this American Narcissus, it’s easy to be hammered into a stupor by the accumulated acts of vanity. Oh look, we think to ourselves, there’s our new president accepting his Nobel Peace Prize. There’s the president likening his election to the West’s victory in the Cold War. There’s the commander in chief bragging about his March Madness picks.

Yet it’s important to remember that our presidents aren’t always this way. When he accepted command of the Revolutionary forces, George Washington said,

“I feel great distress, from a consciousness that my abilities and military experience may not be equal to the extensive and important Trust. .  .  . I beg it may be remembered, by every Gentleman in the room, that I, this day, declare with the utmost sincerity, I do not think myself equal to the Command I am honored with.”

Accepting the presidency, Washington was even more reticent. Being chosen to be president, he said, “could not but overwhelm with despondence one who, inheriting inferior endowments from nature and unpracticed in the duties of civil administration, ought to be peculiarly conscious of his own deficiencies.”

In his biography of John Quincy Adams, Robert Remini noted that Adams was not an especially popular fellow. Yet on one of the rare occasions when he was met with adoring fans, “he told crowds that gathered to see and hear him to go home and attend to their private duties.”

And Obama? In light of the present state of his presidency, let’s look back at his most famous oration:

“The journey will be difficult. The road will be long. I face this challenge with profound humility, and knowledge of my own limitations. But I also face it with limitless faith in the capacity of the American people. Because if we are willing to work for it, and fight for it, and believe in it, then I am absolutely certain that generations from now, we will be able to look back and tell our children that this was the moment when we began to provide care for the sick and good jobs to the jobless; this was the moment when the rise of the oceans began to slow and our planet began to heal; this was the moment when we ended a war and secured our nation and restored our image as the last, best hope on earth. This was the moment—this was the time—when we came together to remake this great nation so that it may always reflect our very best selves and our highest ideals.”

The speech was given on June 3, 2008, and the epoch-making historical event to which “this moment” refers throughout is Barack Obama’s victory over Hillary Clinton in the Democratic primaries.

This article pretty much confirms my first impressions of Obama in 2008. He’s always been spoiled and told how wonderful and brilliant he is. No wonder he acts like a petulant child when people dare to challenge him.